what r the chances of a baby gettting aids or hiv if poked by acident with a needle?

Question by joswicho: what r the chances of a baby gettting aids or hiv if poked by acident with a needle?
i use to work at a hospital and got poked few times ive been negative all the timed been a while since i tested my self but been clean baby found one of my old needles in a house i use to live thought i got rid of all my used needles but i guess not i know i feel good needles was for my insulate shot for sugar control

Best answer:

Answer by Haley V
First of all, it is very rare that someone will get aids or hiv from a needle that was sitting out for a long time. Especially since you have been tested multiple times and it came back negative, I wouldn’t worry about it at all. If you want as a precaution, to have the baby tested. Babies are more prone to diseases since they are young and their immune system isn’t fully developed, so signs should show early if the baby was infected, so send the child to the Doctor as a just in case measure. Hope I helped, and if you have any questions please contact me!

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what r the chances of a baby gettting aids or hiv if poked by acident with a needle? — 2 Comments

  1. It is highly unlikely for a number of reasons.

    1.The rate of transmission is very low. Here is information from e-medicine on rate of transmission:
    “The rate of occupational transmission from an HIV-positive source is believed to be 0.3% for a percutaneous exposure and 0.09% for a mucous membrane exposure. The rate of transmission from a hepatitis B-positive source to a nonimmunized host is 6-24% and 1-10% for exposure to hepatitis C.”

    The risk is extremely low 0.3% in healthcare workers exposed through needle sticks from HIV positive patients. I am not sure if it is because there are medications administered to the person getting stuck by the needle that prevent them from seroconverting though.

    2. I am assuming your insulin needles were used subcutaneouly. The risk becomes even lower if that is the case. A subcutaneous needle is even less likely to be contaminated with HIV than an IV needle.

    3. HIV does not stay viable outside the body for very long. You mentioned the needle were old.

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