injections for cure of hepatits-b…are there any side effects..?

Question by jassi s: injections for cure of hepatits-b…are there any side effects..?
i have come to know that there are some type of injections available that can cure hepatits-b completely.But i have heared that they have side effects too and these injections are very costly too.the person given that injections lossed hairs from whole boady and also looses alomst 40% wieght.IS it true..??
they cost alsomt 2.5 lac…are they available below tat cost..
pls help as i am suffering from this disease and wanna get curesd witihn nex 3 months.
i will be very very thankful to those who helped me in gewtting fully cured within 3 months.

Best answer:

Answer by Dr. B
There are different stages of hepatitis B, and the majority of patients do not require treatments. There is an acute infection with hepatitis B. About 80% of people infected with hepatitis B have the acute infection which lasts for weeks, and then they clear the infection and would not have any further problems with hepatitis B in the future. Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (antibodies) can be given after a known exposure to hepatitis B (if not immunized) to prevent the acute hepatitis B infection. I don’t think this is the injection you are talking about though. Treatment for acute hepatitis B is usually supportive care only. Rarely if it is severe then anti-viral therapy is considered in acute hepatitis.
The other 20% of patients infected with hepatitis B do not clear the infection and go onto chronic hepatitis B. It is actually a little more complex than this, because the rate of going on to the chronic phase depends on the age of infection. For example, 90% of infants born with hepatitis B will go onto the chronic phase, 20-50% of individuals infected between ages 2-5 will go onto the chronic phase, and less than 5% of adults infected will go onto the chronic phase. Most patients with hepatitis B do not have symptoms. Some patients in the chronic phase are just carriers and do not have much liver damage. Other patients may have high viral loads and have progressive liver damage. The goal of treatment is to reduce the viral load, reduce liver damage to prevent progression to cirrhosis, and help the immune system clear the infection. Cure is usually not possible because even with therapy the virus may remain in the body. The decision to treat is determined by lab tests, including the degree of elevation of liver function tests, tests for liver function (PT/INR, albumin), whether certain markers of the virus are positive (Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Hepatitis B E Antigen) and sometimes liver biopsy results. Usually a Hepatologist or Infectious Disease Physician evaluates these and determines if treatment should be started and the appropriate treatment for the individual. There are several treatments approved for chronic hepatitis B and I will discuss them. These treatments have been shown to reduce viral load, sometimes help clear the infection, but none of them technically “cure” hepatitis B. Response to therapy varies also.
Pegylated Interferon (Pegasys) is given by injection once a week usually for six months to a year. The drug can cause side effects such as flu-like symptoms, headache, hair loss, fatigue, insomnia, nausea, diarrhea and depression. This is the only injection approved for Hepatitis B and it has the most side effects of the treatments available. It is also used with Ribavirin for hepatitis C. This is what your friend was probably taking.
Lamivudine (Epivir-HBV, Zeffix, or Heptodin) is a pill that is taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common reported side effects include headache, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea and insomnia.
Adefovir Dipivoxil (Hepsera) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common reported side effects are headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, weakness, and worsening liver function within 12 weeks of discontinuing.
Entecavir (Baraclude) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. Side effects are less common with this than the other treatments, but it can be associated with worsening liver tests when discontinued.
Telbivudine (Tyzeka, Sebivo) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common side effects are headache and fatigue.
Tenofovir (Viread) is a pill taken once a day for at least one year or longer. The most common side effects reported are chest pain, other pain, nausea, diarrhea and weakness.
As I said before, you need to discuss this with your doctor to determine if treatment is appropriate in your case and the best option in your case. Good luck to you.

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